Paul Shambroom, MEETINGS SERIES / New-York,-Manh-CB10
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New-York,-Manh-CB10
Manhattan Community Board 10, New York, New York, March 6, 2002. (L to R): Neal Clark (2nd Vice Chair), Dawud Muhammad (Treasurer), Sean Small (Assistant Secretary), Carolyn Tolbert (Secretary), Stanley Gleaton (Chair)
(#3067/18-19) 2002, Archival pigmented inkjet on canvas with varnish, 24X66 inches

General Board Meeting

March 6, 2002

Harlem State Office Building

163 West 125th Street, Art Gallery

 

Hon. Stanley N. Gleaton, Presiding

 

MEMBERS PRESENT

Hon. Stanley N. Gleaton

Hon. Carolyn Tolbert

Hon. Neal Clark

Hon. Sean Small

Hon. Dawud Muhammad

Hon. Auttameese Abernathy

Hon. Alma Alston

Hon. Barbara Barber

Hon. Deneane Brown

Hon. Edward Barnett

Hon. Elizabeth Barksdale

Hon. John Clark

Hon. Marie Harris

Hon. Azeeza Hurston

Hon. Winifred Jackson

Hon. Gloria Jackson

Hon. Dawn Jones

Hon. Gwendolyn Black Jorge

Hon. Debra Julius

Hon. Marie Littlejohn

Hon. Terence Lyon

Hon. Daniel Perez

Hon. Gertrude Rainey

Hon. Gloria Richardson

Hon. Sharonne Salaam

Hon. Gwen Scott

Hon. Herbert Seymour

Hon. Rev. Beverly Smith

Hon. Noreen Clark Smith

Hon. Carrie Smith

Hon. Curtis Still

Hon. Juanita Torres

Hon. Catherine Trouth

Hon. Danni Tyson

Hon. David Weaver

Hon. Joseph Wardally

Hon. Morrison Washington

Hon. Haja Worley

MEMBERS EXCUSED

Hon. E. Ronald Guy

Hon. Keith Faulkner

Hon. Rod Jackman

Hon. Jack Travis

Hon. Dabney Montgomery

MEMBERS ABSENT

Hon. Richard Allen

Hon. Melvin Christian

Hon. Delbert Moore H

on. Karriemah Muhammad

Hon. Shanee Smith

Hon. Rev. Ronald Sullivan

 

Hon. Stanley N. Gleaton called the meeting to order. Hon. Carolyn Tolbert took the roll call at 6:28 PM. At that time there was no quorum, so the meeting moved directly into the Public Session. Hon. Stanley N. Gleaton, presiding.

 

PUBLIC SESSION

 

Mr. Skip Carlson

National Director

Intuit Financial Freedom Foundation's

Quicken Tax Freedom Project

 

I am here tonight to provide free tax assistance to people whose adjusted gross income is $25,000 dollars or less. This applies to 69 of the 127 million tax returns filed in the United States. Obviously, the vast majority of people eligible do not take advantage of this program. You must go on the computer and have internet access. You just go onto the Quicken.com web site and then go to the Tax Freedom web page and complete your return. If your income is less than 25 thousand, the program files your return but does not charge you. It will do your federal, state, and local tax returns, as well as having any refund given to you by direct deposit. This means that you will receive your money from within seven to ten days of filing. So this option has many advantages.

 

We have trained the entire senior class of Frederick Douglas Academy in how to file the returns, so they were able to hold a Taxpayer Assistance Days at the school where they help their families, neighbors and community file their taxes. Two days ago I was at the Milbank Center and we were introducing this service to other agencies and community program leaders.

 

When you first use the system, you have to choose a username and password, and this will allow you to go back any time and see your information from prior years. You will have access to other year's returns. Electronic filing then, for many reasons is becoming the preferred way of filing returns. Direct deposit is also becoming the preferred way of receiving refunds. The program is simple and direct, and has a lot of help and advice features that make it friendly. For instance, the program will ask and remind you about child care credits and expenses if you have children, if you have certain receipts that are deductible.

 

We know that many people my age are scared of these new technologies, but there are a lot of benefits and a number of trained people who can help. We have been working closely with Congressman Rangel's office to help spread the word about this new program.

 

Hon. Guy Mitchell

Assistant Attorney General

Director of the Harlem Office

 

We cover Northern Manhattan (which includes West, Central and East Harlem, as well as Washington Heights and Inwood). We mainly do mediation services, consumer fraud, some criminal issues and since have been there we also do civil rights issues. We also sponsor monthly forums. Recent issues have focused on gang violence, domestic violence, African American judges, Women's History Month, Immigration and a whole group of community issues of relevance to the legal system. On March 28th, our newest forum will be on Women's History and will be at 8 Am in this building on the third floor. We try to be of any assistance we can to this community. Our phone number is (212) 961-4475 and our web site address is www.oag.state.ny.us. I started here in August, and it has been an absolute pleasure working here so far. We are on the 13th floor, and the office is open Monday through Friday from 9 AM to 5 PM.

 

Q: Hon. Barbara Barber: Do you handle payoffs for votes? I'm serious. This time

I'm ready to name names.

A: Mr. Mitchell: Come down to the office anytime and we will sit down and talk

about it.

Q: Hon. Barbara Barber: When?

A: Mr. Mitchell: Anytime, I gave you my hours. We will do a complaint form and

follow up.

Statement/Question: Hon. Barbara Barber: I'm coming down tomorrow on my

lunch hour. I want an investigation.

Statement/ Question: Mr. Foster: We have been reporting information to the

Attorney General's Office for years now and we have not been getting any

positive feedback. In particular, we have not resolved the issue of Ms. Baker, who

is running a criminal enterprise. You can check Gutman v. Foster, 1988. Thank

you.

A: Mr. Mitchell: Send me the information, and we will sit down and check it out.

Q: Audience: What are the last four numbers of the phone number, and secondly,

do you deal with cases of police brutality?

A: Mr. Mitchell: Yes, if the case deals with human or civil rights violations, and our number is (212 961- 4475.

 

Q: Community Resident: What if a supermarket has something for $10, and it really costs 50 cents. Is that a crime, because I think it is?

A: Mr. Mitchell: well, if it was a false advertisement, but here is also misleading and deceptive advertisement as well.

Q: Community Resident: Can someone go in your house, if you owe him or her

money, and take the money's worth out of you house?

A: Mr. Mitchell: No one can take any object from your house unless they have a

proper search warrant. Talk to my office.

Q: Audience: If there is an advertisement in the flier or newspaper you should not have to give anyone your personal information, like your social security number. You should not put any money up front either. Those are usually scams or frauds.

A: Mr. Mitchell: Thank you, that's exactly right.

Statement: Community Resident: I just want to say, "Welcome home".

A: Mr. Mitchell: Thank you.

Q: Mr. Martin Smith: What do you feel about the recent decision of the Louima

cops?

A: Mr. Mitchell: Well, it is in District Attorney Charles Hynes jurisdiction. They are talking about a retrial on different charges. As the representative of the Attorney General, our office has issued its opinion on the judgment. As an

individual and as an African American attorney, I was and am extremely

disappointed.

 

Hon. Alma Alston

Chair, Aging Committee

Community Board # 10

 

Michelle Paige Patterson

Government Liaison

North General Hospital

 

Thank you. I am the new community relations person for North General Hospital. I have been living in Harlem for the last two years, and I am surprised that many people in the community do not know about us. North General is the only private, black run hospital on the entire East Coast, and it is the largest private employer in the Harlem Community. We have some fliers and some information on the tables and at the Community Board about some of the programs we have at the hospital.

 

Ms. Getty Arnila

Community Outreach and Health Education Coordinator

North General Hospital

 

North General, as Michelle said, is a black owned hospital. We do a lot of work in the community. On May 22nd, we are doing a Health Fair. The fair will have free testing for a number of ailments, with a particular focus on preventable diseases. It will be on 122nd Street. We aim to make the community more aware of diabetes, asthma, cancer and hypertension. We will also try to bring the doctors out in the community with us, so we can all meet our doctors on a personal level. We will also listen to you regarding what advice you can give us.

 

Mr. Bilal Thompson

Drop the Rock Campaign

 

Good evening. I am the outreach coordinator for the Drop the Rock Campaign, an effort to repeal the laws first enacted in 1973. I also am part of the Correctional Association so I am very familiar with the system. When they were first passed, they were named after Governor Nelson Rockerfeller and his misguided War on Drugs. The sentencing structure calls for mandatory 15 years to life for possession of 4 ounces of a controlled narcotic or sale of 2 ounces of a controlled narcotic. It essentially transfers the discretion from the judge to the Assistant District Attorney because they are the ones that control who gets charged with what. The judge is now the District Attorney, and for political purposes they have a bias for longer sentences. With the mandatory sentencing, the judges' hands are tied. The circumstantial factors like how much you are caught with, your role in the crime, your past criminal history of lack of criminal history, or personal circumstances, do not come into play.

 

There are hundreds of people still in jail because of this law solely, and actually have statements from judges in their files that disagree with the sentence imposed. In 1973, there were 15 prisons with 13 thousand prisoners. As of January 1st of this year, there are 70 prisons and 70 thousand prisoners. The budget for the Department of Corrections has grown multiple times over and we spend 759 million dollars yearly to incarcerate the prisoners sentenced under this law.

 

The law is racist. White people do 80 % of drug use, but 94% of drug dealers serving time is either Black or Hispanic. The war on drugs in one of perception. If the government trots out a lot of drugs, and can say they have incarcerated a large number of people, they are trying to give the impression that they are effectively prosecuting the War on Drugs. They are not. Of the 21 thousand people in jail today sentenced under Rockerfeller, 80% of them are admitted drug addicts, with another 80% being non-violent.

 

There has to be some proportionality in terms of sentencing where the crime fits the punishment. This is in no way to diminish the cost of drugs to communities everywhere in both human and economic terms. But the administration of justice is not sane when it comes to this law and its application.

 

Other warped pressures have come into play. The vast majority of the new prisons in the state built since 1973 have been built in the districts of just three upstate Republican State Senators. It is a big business. These men are transferred out of the city and are transferred to these upstate counties where jobs are scarce, and there is a real economic incentive to become prison guards. The census even counts the jail population as residents of the particular county where the jail sits. This transfers even more resources and electoral power upstate. This makes the legislature unfairly weighted upstate. Most women (New York has 3500 women in jail) who are mothers have their children shifted around in the foster care system. There are better alternatives to incarceration. Drug treatment has proven to be a much more effective alternative to incarceration. Especially for nonviolent offenders. It reduces recidivism, costs the public less and keeps families so there is not another generation of future inmates.

 

Get involved. Register to vote. Write your state officials including the Governor and get them to rectify these unjust laws. You can reach us at

www.droptherock.org. We are having a day to lobby upstate in Albany on March

26th.

 

Bentley Whitfield

Black United Fund of New York

Neighborhood Redevelopment Program

 

Hello, we are here to talk about a housing proposal that BUFNY has been designated site control for by HPD. Let me first say something about BUFNY. We are at 2271 Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard and were founded in 1979. We are a not for profit entity, and funds are raised by donations and payroll deductions. We fund various organizations and have given away $15 million dollars in grants since our existence. BUFNY entered housing construction because it saw a great need to help our constituents find and have decent affordable housing. We now manage 429 units in Brooklyn and Manhattan and our construction projects have been worth over $30 million dollars. African American contractors work on all of our projects.

 

For this project, there will be no displaced tenants because we have two phases of construction. When we complete the first building we will move all the tenants into that building while we work on the other adjacent building. We were given site control by HPD in the spring of 2001. The site is located at 17, 19, and 21 West 127th Street. The buildings are now 92 units, but after a gut renovation there will be 72 modern apartments. This project will bring construction and property management jobs to this community. I have here the artistic renderings and other information like the unit mix and the specifications.

 

Q: Hon. Noreen Clark Smith: Where is you architect?

A: Mr. Whitfield: He is not here tonight.

Q: Mr. Foster: What about the mismanagement and malfeasance at some of your

projects?

A: Mr. Whitfield: I am not knowledgeable about the day-to-day operations of any

particular development so I do not know what you are talking about. All of our

property managers file Conflict of Interest paperwork and are bonded.

Q: Community Residents: What about the current residents?

A: Mr. Whitfield: Only 38 apartments are inhabited. The rest are vacant. No one

will be displaced on this project or any project that BUFNY is involved with.

Q: Ms. Nixon: Is that block going to be overcrowded?

A: Mr. Whitfield: Not by this project, because we are taking 92 dilapidated

dwellings and converting them into 72 units. If anything, the density of the block will decrease because of this project.

 

ELECTED OFFICIALS

 

Honorable William Perkins

Councilman, 9th District

 

Good evening. Let me start tonight by giving an update. Monique Washington, a member of Community School District 5, was attacked by a policeman and was maced and charged with disorderly conduct and resisting arrest. She was trying to quell a dispute when the officer attacked her. Today, she held press conference/ communities rally to highlight the fact that these things are still going on in our community. From an elected officials point of view, me Councilman Robert Jackson and State Senator David Paterson are working with the District Attorney and the Police Department to see what policy changes can be effected with regards to these incidents.

 

At the City Council, it is Budget time. The Mayor has released his preliminary budget and hearings will start this month over the effects of the new budget. This budget of course, contains massive cuts for almost every single city agency, and the purpose of the hearings is to hammer out a final agreement amongst the council to decide what sacrifices have to be made and where.

 

The committee that I head, Governmental Operations, will have its hearings on the 12th of March. We deal with Community Boards, the City's Archives, DCAS and a number of other city agencies. We are going to ascertain the effects of budget cuts on these agencies. Let me say that some members of the Council, are already concerned that the only way the preliminary budget seeks to close the massive budget cuts is by borrowing, cutting money or hoping for increased grants from state or federal governments. They have not looked into tax policy, through income tax surcharges, commuter taxes, business or real estate taxes to raise revenue. Keep an eye on that important debate.

 

Statement: Mr. Foster: I respectfully request a moment of silence for William Epton, who passed away recently.

Statement: Councilman: Bill Epton was a Harlem activist for a long time, who owned a print shop near CCNY, and he was a strong fighter for Harlem and social justice. His latest project was a Malcolm X museum, and although he will never see it, there is a lot of interest surrounding this idea that he popularized.

(A moment of silence was observed for Mr. Epton's passing)

 

Q: Mr. Cogan: I think that the Bloomberg administration is following the call of the electorate in stating that we do not want higher taxes. We know that there is a lot of waste in city government and shouldn't that go first? Secondly, I have a problem with the generators that BMCC has running 24/7 that is keeping the residents up all night, and probably wasting energy to boot.

A: Let me just mention that Mr. Keith Lilly is here tonight and we will have a look into the generators by BMCC. Mr. Lilly and are always available at our office on the 7th floor. As you know, BMCC was one of the victims of 9-11 and Fitterman Hall was destroyed by the attacks. If there are disturbances we will work together to fix them. BMCC coming temporarily to Harlem is not some punishment but rather an opportunity for our young people to benefit and get familiar with the school while they are housed in Harlem. If I can bring the debate back to the budget, there is a new program for our young person that cuts the tuition in half for all students that maintain a B average. It is a wonderful program, and it is currently on the chopping block.

 

Q: Hon. Terence Lyon: What will happen to the Museum of the City of New York, and what will the payments be if the city reneges on its deal? A: Councilman: The Museum of the City of New York is proposed to move from its home on museum mile at 103rd Street and Fifth Avenue to the refurbished Tweed Courthouse next to City Hall. Bloomberg has rejected this Giuliani deal, and has agreed with the local city councilman and the Community Board 11 that the museum should stay.

 

Many of you may have heard an idea to move the Board of Education into the building. There has been no formal decision yet or on the possible use for the Tweed Courthouse. The Tweed Courthouse itself is an expensive building to maintain, but the city would actually save money by paying for some improvements for the eventual tenants and other costs, but these expenses dwarf the projected moving costs of the Museum that the city would have bore.

 

Q: Community Resident: What about redistricting?

A: Councilman: Every ten years there is a census. As a result all political districts are changed to deal with the new demographic realities and shifting populations. We are now in the process of creating a new commission to set the new boundaries.

Q: Hon. Carrie Smith: What about term limits?

A: Councilman: As you all know, I am strongly against term limits, and have

always been so on the grounds that I feel that it is undemocratic to tell anyone who they can vote for or how much time someone should represent them. It is why we have elections. It is why we have a democratic process. However, the term limits referendum has passed twice by popular vote, and in a sense the people have spoken. I must admit that the new councilpersons have been somewhat of a breath of fresh air. There has been a learning curve, and it will take some time.

 

My committee will have hearings on term limits and its effects. The Mayor has said he would not support any efforts without a referendum to change the law.

 

In June my committee will be having hearings on reparations. Bills have been submitted by Councilman Charles Barron, State Assemblyman Roger Green, and Congressman Conyers of Michigan at their respective city, state and federal levels. The idea of reparations is an international one, and it has been gathering steam for some time. March 21st has been designated Reparations Day by the City Council, and we will be focusing on all of the issues that surround this topic.

 

Let me tell everyone that there is a Living Wage Bill that is coming to a vote that would create an eight-dollar an hour minimum wage. This would immensely assist health, day care and retail workers, who often earn less than that. It will pass the Council and become much closer to a law that would raise the standard of living for so many African American and Latina women and their families in this city.

 

Lastly, you all will be invited to my installation on March 22nd at the Schomberg Library for Research in Black History and Culture. It will be at 6:00 PM and it would be wonderful if I could see you there.

 

Mr. Terence Tolbert

Chief of Staff

Assemblyman Keith L.T. Wright, 70th District

 

I will be brief. Assemblymen Wright, Farrell, Powell and Espaillat are the second, third, fourth and fifth names on the bill to repeal the Rockefeller Laws. State ¥ Senator Paterson has a similar bill on the Senate side of the legislature. Drop the Rock really does need to happen. March 26th will be the lobbying day for the Drop the Rock Campaign.

 

Secondly, A group of parents from parents from Community School District 5 is lobbying for 260 thousand dollars for a program to deal with school safety. There are two young ladies in the audience right now that came to Albany and represented Harlem well.

 

Third, there will be a hearing next Friday the 15th, at 250 Broadway in the assembly hearing room at 10 Am regarding the new state assembly and senate lines and boundaries.

 

Next Thursday, Thurgood Marshall Academy will have their groundbreaking. Assemblyman Wright will be there. It is a great thing to have a state of the art school there.

 

Finally, West 130th Street and Noreen Clark Smith have fought and earned a well-deserved injunction to stop the new special needs housing sitings on her block. That area was found to have over 10,000 special needs beds within the immediate area. Together, we will win that fight.

 

Ms. Barbara Johnson

Community Board #10 Liaison

Office of the Borough President

 

Hello everyone. Let me tell you all that Yasmeen Hurston Cornelius has left the staff to become a full time mother.

 

We are now at the end of accepting Community Board applications and renewals. They are due to my office by this Friday. I have some application here now so if anyone is interested they should talk to me before I leave tonight. All members are evaluated when they come up for renewal. Criteria include attendance, activism and participation. Let me remind you that we have considered committee attendance reports as well as to the General Board. Please attend committee meetings. My number is 669-2258.

 

Q: Mr. Foster: Shouldn't this Board have a plan instead of being reactive.

A: Ms. Johnson: Yes, it is called the 197-A plan and you should take the time to

acquaint yourself with it. You are correct.

 

ANNOUNCEMENTS

 

Valerie Wright

Family and Friends Program

Harlem Hospital

 

Because of the high number of children living with disabilities living in Community Board #10, we have a program that matches these children with volunteers who interact, teach, play and help these children with their social development. These are children who spend a lot of time in hospitals, and really appreciate someone who can come and spend some time with them. The commitment is just two hours a week to play, tell stories and spend time with these kids. My name is Valerie Wright and call me at (212) 939-4072 for anyone interested.

 

William Allen

District Leader

New York Mission Society Grant Program

 

Good evening. The New York Mission Society is releasing an RFP. The grants are from 10 to 15 thousand dollars per program to develop an adolescent pregnancy program. We are looking at new and cutting edge programs. We will be giving out a total of 180 thousand dollars. If you are interested call me at (212) 368-8400 extension 270.

 

Hon. Stanley Gleaton: Let me remind everyone, that William Allen is also our newly elected district leader.

 

Woody Henderson

National Action Network (NAN)

President of New York Chapter

 

We now have 24 chapters across the country. April 5-8 we will have a National Convention focusing on human right, economics, police &¦ criminal justice, politics & campaigns, civil rights, the role of the church in the community, education, and rehabilitation and reunification of our families. Some of the best minds in the country are coming like Eric Dyson, Cornel West, Hugh Price and Mayor Sharpe James of Newark.

 

The Convention will be at the NY Sheraton Hotel & Towers on 53rd and 7th Avenue. On the 6th, events will take place at the House of Justice in Harlem on 1941 Madison Avenue. If you have a small business and want to find out how you can get involved get in touch. Since we are hosting out of towners, we are particularly interested in folks who can do tours of Harlem. Call me at (212) 987-5020 if you are interested in attending or otherwise participating.

 

On some other issues, let me say that we need people to come out to Brooklyn at 9 AM at 225 Cadman Plaza for a protest. The bail hearing for Charles Schwarz will be happening and we know the police precinct will be there in force. He really needs to be retried.

 

Finally, the NAN will be taking a lead role in attempting to organize and unionize workers for the United Cerebral Palsy. This organization, though it represents a good cause, has been incredibly unfair and underpaying its mostly minority work force.

 

Hon. Stanley Gleaton: I would like to acknowledge Ms. Dina Joyner, our former Board member.

 

Dawn Jones

Community Board Youth Chair

 

We will be honoring the affected families of the Pentagon, World Trade Center, American Airlines Flight 587 and United Airlines Flight 93 disasters on Saturday March 23rd, at 2 PM, at the House of Justice. If you know anyone affected who should be honored or has done good work with these groups, call me (212) 987-5020.

 

Mary Madison

Community Resident

 

Ms. Madison spoke about reparations and a rally on the 21st at the African Burial Ground. She handed out fliers with the information. On another handout, she copied an article regarding the New York Times article on the Belgian government admitting its role in the murder of Black revolutionary Patrice Lamuumba of the Congo. She said the United States and Europe would someday try to re-colonize Africa. Finally, she called for the community to build their own co-operative supermarket instead of having an outside conglomerate operate one on Site 17 at 145th Street and Bradhurst Avenue.

 

 

BUSSINESS SESSION

 

Hon. Stanley N. Gleaton

Hon. Carolyn Tolbert   

Hon. Neal Clark  

Hon. Sean Small  

Hon. Dawud Muhammad    

Hon. Auttameese Abernathy    

Hon. Alma Alston 

Hon. Barbara Barber    

Hon. Deneane Brown     

Hon. Edward Barnett    

Hon. Elizabeth Barksdale     

Hon. John Clark  

Hon. Marie Harris

Hon. Azeeza Hurston    

Hon. Winifred Jackson  

Hon. Gloria Jackson    

Hon. Dawn Jones  

Hon. Gwendolyn Black Jorge   

Hon. Debra Julius

Hon. Herbert Seymour

Hon. Rev. Beverly Smith

Hon. Noreen Clark Smith

Hon. Carrie Smith

Hon. Curtis Still

Hon. Juanita Torres

Hon. Catherine Trouth

Hon. Danni Tyson

Hon. David Weaver

Hon. Joseph Wardally

Hon. Morrison Washington

Hon. Haja Worley

Hon. Gwen Scott

Hon. Sharonne Salaam

Hon. Gloria Richardson

Hon. Gertrude Rainey

Hon. Daniel Perez

Hon. Terence Lyon

Hon. Marie Littlejohn

 

The Agenda was adopted with the corrections of adding the Elected Officials & the Announcements Sections. Motion by Hon. D. Muhammad/ Second by Hon. B. Barber

 

The Chairman's Report, District Manager's Report and the Treasurer's Report were approved.

 

The Minutes for February 2002 were adopted with the necessary corrections.

 

CORRECTIONS FOR JANUARY 2002 MINUTES

 

Hon. Noreen Clark Smith corrected a statement in the minutes made by State Senator David Paterson. The State Senator was addressing the situation facing the 130th Street Homeowners Association not the 132nd Street Block Association.

 

There was also a question to preservationist Michael Adams that asked for the name of his book, not the name of his building.

 

Hon. Elizabeth Barksdale submitted numerous typographical errors and wanted numbers on each page.

 

In the attendance log, Hon. Gloria Jackson was excused not absent.

 

VOTING ITEMS

 

HOUSING & LAND USE

Hon. Daniel Perez, chair

The Black United Fund of New York

 

The General Board voted to table a decision on the housing proposal made by the Black United Development Fund until they appear before the full board with the architect of record.

 

HOUSING & LAND USE

Hon. Daniel Perez, chair

 

Abyssinian Development Corporation's Karen Phillips, Gloria Hopson, Claude Pierre and Zavilla Jackson-Pierre (architect) gave a presentation on the Home Folks Housing Development Corporation plan to develop six brownstones in the Neighborhood Homes Program.

 

The Housing Land Use Committee recommends that the Board approve the following resolution with corrections be sent to the Department of Housing preservation & Development regarding the matter Abyssinian Development Corporation and the Neighborhood Homes Project

 

Neighborhood Homes Program

 

Whereas, under this proposed project, the city will sell the following buildings: 26 West 126th Street (Block 1723, Lot 48), 26 West 130th Street (Block 1727, Lot 50), 34 West 130th Street (Block 1727, Lot 54), 150 West 136th Street (Block 1920, Lot 152) to the Home Folk Housing Development Fund Corporation (sponsor), a not-for-profit corporation formed by Abyssinian Development Corporation, and Whereas, the sponsor will rehabilitate the five buildings in the disposition areas, and

 

Whereas, when completed the project will provide five one-to-four family homes for sale to eligible purchasers, and

 

Whereas, approximate household income will range from $30,000 to $97,515, and

 

Whereas, the new homeowners will then commit to reside in the homes for a minimum of seven years, and that at least 50% of the units be reserved for residents of the Community Board #10 area, and

 

Therefore the Community Board #10 approves the Neighborhood Homes plan.

The vote was:

 

24   YES  

5     NO   

5     ABSTAIN

1               NOT VOTING

 

Meeting Adjourned

 

Approved By,

 

Hon. Carolyn Tolbert

Secretary